Focus Scientific

Average rating based on 5 review(s)

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I bought this telescope last September and it is amazing. The moon and planets show up easily. Visually, deep space objects are easy to see in it. With a good camera and a motor-driviven equatorial mount, full colour pictures can be taken. I would reccommend this telescope to anyone.

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Sky-Watcher 8" Dobsonian Telescope Review In early September, after a very long and careful process consisting of reading dozens and dozens of articles, comparing and contrasting different types of telescopes, I finally decided to buy with the Sky-Watcher, 8? Dobsonian telescope for almost just over $400 (tax included). Starting from the initial ?first light?, I was quite impressed with this telescope. My old 3? low-quality refractor telescope just could not compare with the superior light gathering power and optics of this dob. This scope was simple, and easy to use. It was light enough to carry, without any help from a 2nd person, and it could easily fit in the trunk of a Honda accord/Toyota Camry car. Furthermore, it required an extremely low set up time. Since this telescope?s focal ratio (f/6) is not extremely low (i.e. f/4), I have heard that frequent collimation is not an extremely big deal. However, since the f/6 focal ratio is comparatively still low, like many other dobs, this scope is great for looking at the Deep sky objects because of its wider field of view. The focuser, although a minor detail, is made from the Crayford focuser design. I found that because of this, it moves back and forth a lot smoother than my old rack & pinion from my 3? refractor. Furthermore, there was none of that sticky/ gooey lubricant that came with my old telescope had. The two Pl?ssls eyepieces each gave very good view through the telescope. The image is never distorted around the edges of the field of view, and the rack on the front of the telescope made it very convenient for holding the two eyepieces provided plus an extra Barlow Lens that I decided buy with this scope. The sole complaint that I have with the eyepieces provided (albeit a minor one) is the fact that you must to roll down the rubber eyecups every time you put on the eyepiece caps. It gets a bit annoying, but as it only adds seconds to the set up/ tear down time, I cannot really make a big deal out of it. With the purchase of an extra Barlow lens, I found it very useful as it virtually doubled my eyepiece collection from 2 two 4 for only $30. I found the Barlow extremely useful for planetary and lunar views, because it gave me great images with up to 300 magnifications for the brighter objects. However, for looking at the deep sky objects, I found it a bit tedious to take the separate/connecting the eyepiece from/to the Barlow lens, especially during the cold winter observing sessions. Furthermore, the small exit pupil caused by the Barlow made it hard to use when looking at the dimmer deep sky objects. The cool down time for this telescope is not that bad. This is because when it is 10 degrees below freezing outside, I can just carry the telescope outside onto my porch, leaving the lens caps off, before getting dressed to let it cool. Then, by the time, I am done putting on my typical three or four layers of winter clothing; the telescope has already cooled down well enough to use without any problems. As for the location of the eyepiece, I find it in a perfect position to view when kneeling on one knee. Furthermore, if you ever want to make a few sketches as you observe, the eyepiece is at the perfect height for the average adult when he/she is sitting in a chair. The location of the finder scope however, is just a bit annoying. Since it is a straight through finder, I have to bend down in order to look through it. This becomes especially uncomfortable when it comes to looking at the objects extremely close to the zenith. But then again, it is hard for ANY telescope to observe objects located directly overhead. Moreover, if there had been a diagonal to place the eyepiece of the finder scope in a more convenient location, it would have made the image that we see a mirrored-image. This can easily cause further confusion for the beginner (like me) as the finder scope already produces an image that is upside down. On the other hand, it is very easy to align the finder scope with the telescope. In fact, I was able to do it in less than a minute on my first try! Another thing to note about the finder is that the field of view (6?) combined with its magnification, gives a very good view of the sky. It is significantly easier to locate objects because I can see the dimmer stars required to star-hop, especially through the suburbs light pollution. During the humid and warmer days, the finder scope always fogs up before the telescope. It can get slightly annoying because it sometimes starts fogging up after a couple hours outside. However, I have read that if you put a dew cover, by cutting out a cylindrical sheet of Styrofoam, and putting it in around the front of the finder, it will prevent fast dewing. I have yet to try out this technique. The main disadvantage with any dobsonian telescope is that I has no motor drive, or is it equatorially mounted. This makes it much more limited in the in the astrophotography aspect. For the beginner although it may seem tempting to try doing some astrophotography, it is much better to just forget about it for now, and just learn how to observe with our eyes. This is because for the price difference, it is much more economical for a beginner to stick with visual astronomy. However, if you are in my situation, where you have a DSLR camera that you already use for other reasons, it might be tempting to spend an extra 20 bucks on a T2 ring adapter, and try to take some astronomical photos. Since I have never tried doing something like this, I cannot really comment on how well this will work out. In conclusion, although it does have a few minor faults, this telescope is ideal for a beginner astronomer, looking to get some great views of the heavens. I am impressed with the visual performance. The 8? aperture of this scope really makes many objects like globular clusters, nebulae, and many others simply breathtaking. The very straightforward point-and-view design of dobsonians really makes this telescope idiot proof. Virtually anyone can operate this telescope within minutes. The price is VERY reasonable, and extremely worthwhile. This scope will certainly yield the best quality images for your money spent. I would definitely recommend this scope to beginner/novice interested in astronomy.

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Sky-Watcher 8 inch Dobsonian Telescope Review In early September, after a very long and careful process consisting of reading dozens and dozens of articles, comparing and contrasting different types of telescopes, I finally decided to buy with the Sky-Watcher, 8? Dobsonian telescope for just over $400 (tax included). Starting from the initial ?first light?, I was quite impressed with this telescope. My old 3? low-quality refractor telescope just could not compare with the superior light gathering power and optics of this dob. This scope was simple, and easy to use. It was light enough to carry, without any help from a 2nd person, and it could easily fit in the trunk of a Honda accord/Toyota Camry car. Furthermore, it required an extremely low set up time. Since this telescope?s focal ratio (f/6) is not extremely low (i.e. f/4), I have heard that frequent collimation is not an extremely big deal. However, since the f/6 focal ratio is comparatively still low, like many other dobs, this scope is great for looking at the Deep sky objects because of its wider field of view. The focuser, although a minor detail, is made from the Crayford focuser design. I found that because of this, it moves back and forth a lot smoother than my old rack & pinion from my 3? refractor. Furthermore, the focuser did not have any sticky or gooey lubricant like the one that my old telescope focuser had. The two Pl?ssls eyepieces each gave very good view through the telescope. The image is never distorted around the edges of the field of view, and the rack on the front of the telescope made it very convenient for holding the two eyepieces provided plus an extra Barlow Lens that I decided buy with this scope. The sole complaint that I have with the eyepieces provided (albeit a minor one) is the fact that you must to roll down the rubber eyecups every time you put on the eyepiece caps. It gets a bit annoying, but as it only adds seconds to the set up/ tear down time, I cannot really make a big deal out of it. With the purchase of an extra Barlow lens, I found it very useful as it virtually doubled my eyepiece collection from 2 two 4 for only $30. I found the Barlow extremely useful for planetary and lunar views, because it gave me great images with up to 300 magnifications for the brighter objects. However, for looking at the deep sky objects, I found it a bit tedious to take the separate/connecting the eyepiece from/to the Barlow lens, especially during the cold winter observing sessions. Furthermore, the small exit pupil caused by the Barlow made it hard to use when looking at the dimmer deep sky objects. The cool down time for this telescope is not that bad. This is because when it is 10 degrees below freezing outside, I can just carry the telescope outside onto my porch, leaving the lens caps off, before getting dressed to let it cool. Then, by the time, I am done putting on my typical three or four layers of winter clothing; the telescope has already cooled down well enough to use without any problems. As for the location of the eyepiece, I find it in a perfect position to view when kneeling on one knee. Furthermore, if you ever want to make a few sketches as you observe, the eyepiece is at the perfect height for the average adult when he/she is sitting in a chair. The location of the finder scope however, is just a bit annoying. Since it is a straight through finder, I have to bend down in order to look through it. This becomes especially uncomfortable when it comes to looking at the objects extremely close to the zenith. But then again, it is hard for ANY telescope to observe objects located directly overhead. Moreover, if there had been a diagonal to place the eyepiece of the finder scope in a more convenient location, it would have made the image that we see a mirrored-image. This can easily cause further confusion for the beginner (like me) as the finder scope already produces an image that is upside down. On the other hand, it is very easy to align the finder scope with the telescope. In fact, I was able to do it in less than a minute on my first try! Another thing to note about the finder is that the field of view (6?) combined with its magnification, gives a very good view of the sky. It is significantly easier to locate objects because I can see the dimmer stars required to star-hop, especially through the suburbs light pollution. During the humid and warmer days, the finder scope always fogs up before the telescope. It can get slightly annoying because it sometimes starts fogging up after a couple hours outside. However, I have read that if you put a dew cover, by cutting out a cylindrical sheet of Styrofoam, and putting it in around the front of the finder, it will prevent fast dewing. I have yet to try out this technique. The main disadvantage with any dobsonian telescope is that I has no motor drive, or is it equatorially mounted. This makes it much more limited in the in the astrophotography aspect. For the beginner although it may seem tempting to try doing some astrophotography, it is much better to just forget about it for now, and just learn how to observe with our eyes. This is because for the price difference, it is much more economical for a beginner to stick with visual astronomy. However, if you are in my situation, where you have a DSLR camera that you already use for other reasons, it might be tempting to spend an extra 20 bucks on a T2 ring adapter, and try to take some astronomical photos. Since I have never tried doing something like this, I cannot really comment on how well this will work out. In conclusion, although it does have a few minor faults, this telescope is ideal for a beginner astronomer, looking to get some great views of the heavens. I am impressed with the visual performance. The 8? aperture of this scope really makes many objects like globular clusters, nebulae, and many others simply breathtaking. The very straightforward point-and-view design of dobsonians really makes this telescope idiot proof. Virtually anyone can operate this telescope within minutes. The price is VERY reasonable, and extremely worthwhile. This scope will certainly yield the best quality images for your money spent. I would definitely recommend this scope to beginner/novice interested in astronomy.

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Great scope. Did a lot of homework before buying and I was stuck between this scope and the orion xt8 and I feel as if I have made a good decision. Really easy to use and great optics for the price. Would defiantly recommend this to anyone.

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Awesome, the 8 inch mirror is really great, I can see start you can't even see with the naked eye with this in a street with street lights on! Almost everywhere I point it theres stars! Awesome mirror. But this isn't very portable and is heavy.

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